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DRMA members consistently report that their Number 1 concern is that they cannot find workers with the skills required for today’s advanced workplaces. Manufacturing Industry-Recognized Credentials can be a solution.

 

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Manufacturing Industry Credentials - NIMS MMS Core Competencies

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 17, 2019

There are a number of manufacturing related industry credentials out there.  The most common ones, and the ones that DRMA and local high schools and community colleges are working on, are produced by the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC) and the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS).  More information about these credentials can be found here. This month we’re doing a deeper dive into what earning a NIMS credential actually involves.  NIMS offers a wide range of credentials (full list here), but most schools in the area are focusing on the Measurement, Materials, and Safety (MMS) credential. Individuals who earn the NIMS MMS credential come to you with a nationally-validated understanding of the following:

Applied Mathematics

·         Arithmetic

·         Pythagorean Theorem

·         Right Angle Trigonometry

·         Use of Scientific Calculator

Filing

·         File Maintenance

·         File Selection

·         File Types

·         Filing Techniques

Fits

·         ANSI Standard Fit Symbols

·         Classes of Fits

Geometrical Dimensioning and Tolerancing

·         Feature Control Frame

·         Geometric Control Symbols

·         Geometric Tolerancing Categories

·         Geometric Tolerancing Characteristics

·         Geometric Tolerancing Zone Shapes

·         Symbols Associated with Feature Control Frames

Inspection

·         Gage Block Assembly

·         Sampling Procedure

Machine Maintenance

·         Coolants

·         Oils and Lubrications

·         Refractometer Readings

Machine Safety

·         Machine Guarding

Machining Applications

·         Drilling

·         Pocket Milling

·         Reaming

·         Tapping

Materials

·         Standard Steel Classification

·         Standard Steel Numbering System (AISI/SAE)

Measurements

·         Reading Micrometers

·         Reading Steel Rule

·         Reading Vernier Scales

Print Reading

·         Block Tolerances

·         Line Types and Conventions

·         Orthographic Projection

·         Surface Finish Requirements

·         Title Blocks and Revisions

Shop Safety

·         Blood Born Pathogen

·         Fire Prevention/Suppression

·         Hazardous Material Information System (HMIS)

·         Lock Out/Tag Out

·         Means of Egress (Evacuation)

·         Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

·         Safety Data Sheets (SDS)

·         Waste Removal

One of the greatest benefits of hiring a person with an industry recognized credential is that it gives you a measure of what someone knows and that they have proved to be competent in the areas listed above.

To find out how you can be connected with graduates who have industry credentials and who are ready for hire, contact Kayla or give us a call at (937) 949-4000.

Tags:  manufacturing  NIMS  workforce  workforce development 

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Manufacturing Industry Credentials - CPT Core Competencies

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 16, 2019

We’re doing a deeper dive into what earning the CPT actually involves.  Individuals who earn the CPT credential come to you with a nationally validated understanding in the following four concentrations:


Safety

·         Work in a Safe and Productive manner in a Manufacturing Workplace

·         Understand and perform safety and environmental inspections

·         Participate in emergency teams

·         Identify unsafe conditions and take corrective action

·         Provide safety orientation for all employees

·         Use equipment safely and monitor safety

·         Suggest processes and procedures that support safety of work environment

·         Fulfill safety and health requirements for maintenance, installation, and repair

·         Safe workplace practices

·         NOTE:  Students can secure an OSHA 10 Card while taking the more extensive CPT Safety training. 

Quality Practices and Measurement

·         Participate in internal quality audit activities

·         Check calibration of gages and other data collection equipment

·         Suggest continuous improvements

·         Inspect materials and product/process at all stages to ensure they meet specifications

·         Document the results of quality tests

·         Communicate quality problems

·         Take corrective actions to restore or maintain quality

·         Record process outcomes and trends

·         Identify fundamentals of blueprint reading

·         Use common measurement systems and precision measurement tools such as micrometers and calipers

Manufacturing Processes and Production

·         Identify customer needs

·         Determine resources available for the production process

·         Set up equipment for the production process

·         Set team production goals

·         Make job assignments

·         Coordinate work flow with team members and other work groups

·         Communicate production and material requirements and product specifications

·         Perform and monitor the process to make the product

·         Document product and process compliance with customer requirements

·         Prepare final product for shipping or distribution

Maintenance Awareness

·         Perform preventive maintenance and routine repair

·         Monitor indicators to ensure correct operations

·         Perform all housekeeping to maintain production schedule

·         Recognize potential maintenance issues with basic production systems, including knowledge of when to inform maintenance personnel about problems with:

o    Electrical systems

o    Pneumatic systems

o    Hydraulic systems

o    Machine automation systems

o    Lubrication processes

o    Bearings and couplings

o    Belts and chain drives


One of the greatest benefits of hiring a person with an industry recognized credential is that it gives you a measure of what someone knows and that they have proved to be competent in the areas listed above.

To find out how you can be connected with graduates who have industry credentials and who are ready for hire, contact Kayla or give us a call at (937) 949-4000.

Tags:  cpt  industry  manufacturing  workforce 

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Manufacturing Industry Credentials – What are the Advantages of Hiring Employees with Industry Credentials?

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Some of our member companies have taken advantage of the skill sets that these students have acquired and benefitted from hiring workers and interns that have gone through these programs.  According to Jeff Perry at FC Industries, “DRMA does a lot to help address the workforce needs of the manufacturing industry. The work they do with educators to incorporate industry-recognized credentials into their curriculum and produce credentialed graduates has helped me find more qualified employees. Industry credentials take the guesswork out of hiring, because the credential tells me what the candidate knows and can do based standards developed by manufacturers across the country. It also shows that the candidate has a genuine interest in manufacturing and has invested time into learning the necessary skills.”

Learn about the advantages of hiring people with industry-recognized credentials at our next Workforce/HR Meet Up. Scott Ellsworth, senior advisor for the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC), will be on hand to talk about why he, as a former manufacturer, believes in the value of industry credentials and how they work. The Meet Up is on March 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. at Barry Staff in downtown Dayton. Click here to register.  (Meet Ups are free and for DRMA members only.)

To find out how you can be connected with graduates who have industry credentials and who are ready for hire, contact Kayla or give us a call at (937) 949-4000.

Tags:  industry  manufacturing  workforce 

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Manufacturing Industry Credentials - Training Programs in the Dayton Region

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 15, 2019
DRMA is working with educators across the region to incorporate industry credentials into their curriculum.  In last month’s newsletter, we listed the area schools who are offering industry recognized credentials.  This month was have updated information from our educational partners:

Clark State Community College has incorporated the NIMS Machining Level 1 – Measurement, Materials & Safety credential in their manufacturing FASTRACK program which prepares adults for entry-level careers in manufacturing.
Upper Valley Career Center’s adult program has incorporated the NIMS Machining Level 1 – Measurement, Materials & Safety credential into their Precision Tooling and Machining program.  UVCC is also a recognized member of ApprenticeOhio and places students with employers through that program.  For manufacturers who also have logistics needs, UVCC is offering two logistics certifications through MSSC (CLA and CLT).
Northridge High School is offering a manufacturing program to their juniors and seniors which requires successful completion of the CPT credential.  About 25 students are on in the process for earning their CPT.
Centerville High School is offering a manufacturing program to their juniors and seniors which requires successful completion of the CPT credential.  There are currently 17 students enrolled in their CPT program, and several students are currently interning with companies in the area.
Miami Valley Career Technology Center is gearing up to offer a manufacturing training program for non-precision machining high school students based on the CPT credential.

If you want more information on these programs or have a contact at a school that may be interested in working with DRMA on industry credentials, contact Kayla or call at (937) 949-4000.

Tags:  manufacturing  Ohio  workforce 

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Manufacturing Industry Credentials – Dayton Region Initiatives

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 8, 2019

DRMA is working with high schools, career tech centers, and colleges across the region to incorporate industry credentials into their curriculum.  It is important for students to be aware of the job market in their area and have the opportunities to succeed in these industries.  For that reason, many regional schools are taking notice and beginning to work with DRMA on programs that include industry-recognized credentials, including:

 

·         Clark State Community College has incorporated the NIMS Machining Level 1 – Measurement, Materials & Safety credential in their manufacturing FASTRACK program which prepares adults for entry-level careers in manufacturing.

·         Upper Valley Career Center’s adult program has incorporated the NIMS Machining Level 1 – Measurement, Materials & Safety credential into their Precision Tooling and Machining program.

·         Northridge High School is offering a manufacturing program to their juniors and seniors which requires successful completion of the CPT credential.  About 25 students are on in the process for earning their CPT.

·         Centerville High School is offering a manufacturing program to their juniors and seniors which requires successful completion of the CPT credential.  About 20 students are on course to earn the CPT by the end of the 2018-2019 school year, and several have already earned it and are available for part-time employment right now.

·         Miami Valley Career Technology Center is gearing up to offer a manufacturing training program for non-precision machining high school students based on the CPT credential.

 

If you want more information on these programs or have a contact at a school that may be interested in working with DRMA on industry credentials, contact Kayla at kmanuel@daytonrma.com or call at (937) 949-4000.

Tags:  credentials  manufacturing  workforce 

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Industry credentials – What types are there? How are they achieved?

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 8, 2019

Industry credentials can help solve DRMA manufacturer members’ skills gap challenges because they ensure that the credential holder has met the industry benchmark for their specific occupational competency. Industry credentials offer your company several benefits, including: more job-ready candidates; shorter training time for employees; improved safety and quality; reduced turnover; and increased productivity.

There are a number of manufacturing related industry credentials out there.  The most common ones, and the ones that DRMA and local high schools and community colleges are working on, are produced by the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC) and the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS).

MSSC’s Certified Production Technician (CPT) program recognizes individuals who demonstrate mastery of the core competencies of manufacturing production at the front-line (entry-level through front-line supervisor) through the successful completion of the certification assessments. The goal of the CPT certification program is to raise the level of performance of production workers both to assist the individuals in finding higher-wage jobs and to help employers ensure their workforce increases the company’s productivity and competitiveness.

The CPT program consists of five individual certificate modules: Safety; Quality Practices & Measurement; Manufacturing Processes & Production; and Maintenance Awareness.  Candidates must earn the all four certificates to receive the full CPT certification.  An optional fifth module is available on Green Production.  Individuals demonstrate their understanding of the core skills and knowledge through assessments based upon MSSC's industry-defined, nationally validated skill standards. You can learn more about the Certified Production Technician certification here.

 

NIMS sets industry skills standards earned by students, trainees, apprentices, employees, and military personnel nationwide. By earning NIMS credentials, these individuals secure a competitive edge when applying for jobs because they have demonstrated that their skills meet the industry established standards.

NIMS offers credentials in numerous industry occupation tracks; however, the two that most closely align with the needs of DRMA members are Machining and Industrial Technology Maintenance. Each track is comprised of stackable credentials that are achieved via successful completion of individual theory and/or performance assessments.

Some NIMS Machining stackable credentials include:

·         Job Planning, Benchwork & Layout

·         Measurement, Materials & Safety

·         CNC Lathe Operations

·         CNC Lathe Programming Setup & Operations

 

Some NIMS  Industrial Technology Maintenance stackable credentials include:

·         Basic Hydraulic Systems

·         Basic Mechanical Systems

·         Maintenance Operations

·         Process Control Systems

You can learn more about NIMS credentials here.

 

DRMA is working with educators across the region to incorporate industry credentials into their curriculum.  Soon, graduates possessing these credentials will be ready for hire.

Stay tuned for more information about the value of industry credentials.

Tags:  industry  manufacturing  workforce 

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Industry-based credentials – What are they? And why YOUR company should care about them

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 8, 2019

DRMA members consistently report that their Number 1 concern is that they cannot find workers with the skills required for today’s advanced workplaces. The skills gap is widening as companies scramble to find qualified employees, and new hires who are not the right fit can mean companies losing out after spending hundreds of hours recruiting, onboarding, and training.

The use of industry credentials is one way to help address the skills gap challenge and ensure your workforce is made up of the most qualified employees. Industry credentials ensure that the credential holder has met the industry benchmark for their specific occupational competency. For new hires, industry credentials can be used as screening tools for knowledge, skills, and abilities to do the job well; and for current workers, industry credentials can help bolster their skills and keep them at the top of their trade.

There are many reputable industry-based credentials out there to meet your company’s needs. Some of note include the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council’s (MSSC) Production Technician Certification (CPT); the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) credentials; and the American Welding Society’s professional certifications.

Whichever certifications you choose based on your employee skills requirements, your company will be better positioned to identify qualified applicants for open positions and to improve the skills of your existing workforce.

DRMA is working with educators across the region to incorporate industry credentials into their curriculum.  Soon, graduates possessing these credentials will be ready for hire.

You can learn more about the Certified Production Technician certification here.  Stay tuned for more information about the value of industry credentials.

 

Tags:  industry  manufacturing  workforce 

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